Six on Saturday – An Oath By a Tap and Autumn Favourites. 13๐ŸŒธ5๐ŸŒธ23

Another mild and lovely week here, with some decidedly cool mornings that necessitated a heater, socks, and jumpers to be used, almost frosty! But fantabulous gardening weather! I have been still busy transplanting my little rooted plants, plus making a border around the back garden of pot marigolds. I enjoy the watering in the new plants in the gently warm sunny days. Plus I have started in earnest to transplant clumps of my couch grass Wintergreen to my front garden, starting the replacement lawn. In previous years, I have concentrated on the grass, on my new side rose garden area and they are now growing nicely.

I have another Australian-ism for you. I had to have a plumber come out to fix one of the garden taps this week. It was my driveway and it had sprung a leek. He fixed this tap which is on one of the outer areas of the garden but nonetheless useful for watering the natives that I plant up the hill.

Once he had straightened and fixed the tap and the ‘lean’ (it was on a lean since we arrived here for over 20 years). I was excited that it was fixed and ‘straightened’ and I said it was in an odd spot, but I liked to water my natives with it, and he replied “Bloody Oath!”. I have not heard this phrase in a while, if at all in real life (maybe I mix in the wrong circles!). I was quite delighted by his response, and I knew you would be delighted with it too! I it is annunciated, so that the words run into each other as though it is one word and almost growled out in response to an exiting thought ! I don’t know exactly what ‘oath’ it referred too, but it was certainly exciting!

My favourite rose-bud pelargoium which is a plumy burgundy colour. Heidesommer rose, the single white rose, is a hardy Kordes rose. It is new to my garden, but I am most impressed by her beautiful scent and strong growth and the little roses bloom in clusters. Queen Adelaide rose. As I have been renovating all of my gardens, in the last 3 years, I have found some seeds that come up miraculously after many years. The green plant here is a Sweet Mignonette plant that has fragrant leaves, I don’t remember when I last planted them, but it was over 10 years ago!
Salvia Waverley, Staff Pelargonium, and new plant acquisition a white version of the Salvia mexicanus plant, that I have been after for a few years.
My favourite Ivy Leafed climbing pelargonium with blush pink flowers, roses flowering this week and my new grass transplant to the front garden!
A treat at this time of year a bright cerise red Nerines pop out of nowhere in the autumn gardenscape. This variety is a very hardy one given to me by a lovely elderly neighbour, it is much hardier than a pink variety I bought. Red roses Fire and Ice and oldie Francis Dubreuil. A lovely ruby coloured hybrid diascia I could not resist from the local hardware store, (it was only $2.50 cheaper than a coffee!) with parsley and lamb’s ear.

Not to be outshone by the roses, the hardy pelargoniums keep on flowering month after month, with their bright happy blooms. Some are in pots and some are growing in the garden in the sheltered garden beds near the house.
Pussycats keeping me company in the garden and a lovely purple calbrichoa in a hanging basket. Autumn foliage on a Chinese elm against the blue sky. The lovely purple Salvia mexicanus that I have reproduced and planted lots of little plants around the garden.

Thatโ€™s all from me.๐ŸŒธ See more beautiful Six on Saturday gardens from around the world, on the Six on the Saturday tag, our host is Jim you can find his blog here .
Thanks for visiting. ๐ŸŒธ Happy Gardening โ€“ Sarah ๐ŸŒธ

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14 Comments Add yours

  1. Pรกraig says:

    BloodyOath! Red/cerise Nerines… I’ve never come across any other than the pinks. My mam loved them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      How lovely ๐ŸŒธ It’s nice to grow your loved ones favourite plants!

      Like

  2. Rosie Amber says:

    What small plants are you planting out if frosts are on the way? The cold would nip most things that I planted out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      Hi Rosie, I guess the degrees of frost is different to other places. While we get frosts, ours are mild compared to other places.We get them more on our front lawn, but they don’t touch the plants on the edges of the beds near the trees. Plus the days warm up nicely on our frosty days which we typically get more in late winter early spring. I used to live in the Adelaide Hills and the frosts there would turn all the plants I grow here to slime, they were colder and harder. โ„

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I’ve not heard that Australianism before! A lovely selection as always, especially the flowers of the Ivy Leafed climbing pelargonium.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      No that phrase would be banned on Home and Away and the other shows. Thanks very much, she flowers for months which is very acceptable! ๐ŸŒธ

      Liked by 1 person

  4. fredgardener says:

    How lovely is the Salvia Waverley ! Original colors…!
    I understand how great it is to have a cat around you in the garden. I lost mine last week who died after 15 years and we miss him right now. But I have no doubt that another pet will soon replace him…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      Aw so sorry to hear that! We gave 3 cats and they are all characters! ๐Ÿˆโ€โฌ›๐Ÿ’ž They certainly become part of the family.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Noelle says:

    I can see that geraniums work nicely in your garden, and as I read in your answers above you can keep them outside all year round. I love the way the cuttings come easily too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      I know they are very easy to strike. In some wet years I put some cuttings directly into the ground! They weren’t a favourite of mine initially, until I realised how well they can grow and all of the pretty new varieties available these days. ๐ŸŒธ๐Ÿ’ž

      Like

  6. smallsunnygarden says:

    Sometimes I think autumn roses are the best–yours are lovely! As are all the pelargoniums; you’re reminding me I need to try adding some to the borders as I go on. They should survive winter in the warmer parts of the garden at least.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      Thanks love. ๐ŸŒธ Yeah the autumn roses some years can be huge in the cooler weather! Pelargoniums are really great in hot gardens. They are your reward for putting up with all the heat. ๐Ÿ’žโ˜€๏ธ

      Like

  7. What a lovely selection! The pelargoniums are so pretty, and I love that they continue to provide color and beauty for so long. (That’s a new expression to me!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sarah Rajkotwala - Author & Spiritual Teacher says:

      Thanks so much love ๐Ÿ’ž I know, you’ve got to reward the plants that are real goers in your garden, ๐ŸŒธ and plant more of them!

      Like

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